Author Topic: Looking toward getting an M1911  (Read 484 times)

Offline uptown

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Re: Looking toward getting an M1911
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2020, 08:52:28 PM »
The Rock Island 1911/45 is a real nice solid pistol. Nice balance and real accurate at 30yds. I shot a doe on the run, in the head at that distance couple of years ago. Nothing fancy just basic issue stuff. I think I paid 400 or 450 for it.
As far as storage, check out Tactical Walls. They make some pretty cool stuff.
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Offline saggs

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Re: Looking toward getting an M1911
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2020, 01:15:39 PM »
Glock only.

I guess if you like a handgun with all the ergonomics of a brick, horrible sights, a grip angle made for people with deformed wrists, and a trigger with more creep than Harvey Weinstein.

 :neener:


EDIT:  I'm just trying to kick off the inevitable Glock fan-boy vs. 1911 fan-boy vs. CZ fan-boy rumble.   :aok

« Last Edit: June 07, 2020, 01:21:08 PM by saggs »

Offline Mayhem

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Re: Looking toward getting an M1911
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2020, 05:51:30 PM »
I guess if you like a handgun with all the ergonomics of a brick, horrible sights, a grip angle made for people with deformed wrists, and a trigger with more creep than Harvey Weinstein.

And a chamber that does not fully support the cartridge
And Polygonal Rifling that causes massive build up with Lead and Copper wash bullets.
And you can't use +P loads in
And you can't use handloads in without voiding your warranty.
And lack of a hammer which means you can only hit the primer once with the pin before ejecting the round.

I posted this on HT's new toy thread ....

The biggest problem with the Glocks in .40 S&W is that their chamber does not fully support the case, and the barrels design is not friendly to lead and copper wash bullets, You have to use copper jacketed rounds in a Glock. Scratch +P hot loads like Cor-bon and Buffalo bore to. Handloads void your warranty.

Unsupported Chamber, with a Polygonal rifled barrel, Firing Lead Bullets, Followed by +P Loads, causes a glock to go KABOOM!

http://f-r-i.com/glock/FAQ/FAQ-kb.htm

They also lack a hammer which brings up a new problem that left me with a scar under my right eye. I had a factory cartridge with a bad primer fail to fire. I waited the obligatory 10 count, ejected the round and BOOOM! the cartridge went off hitting me in the face with brass fragments .... If I wasn't wearing eye protection I would be blind in my right eye.

I returned my issued glock and purchased a Smith and Wesson 411 .40 and a Sig p229 .40, I fell in love the p229 and made it my primary duty/carry weapon.

I have loved Sigs ever since. Now I have a p220st .45 a p220 .40 and a p239 .40. I carry them all (Usually not at the same time).

Unfortunately Sig has been moving away from their p2XX designs for the last decade and I hear they are closing their European factories due to financial and legislative problems.
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Offline ACE

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Re: Looking toward getting an M1911
« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2020, 06:01:28 PM »
I guess if you like a handgun with all the ergonomics of a brick, horrible sights, a grip angle made for people with deformed wrists, and a trigger with more creep than Harvey Weinstein.

 :neener:


EDIT:  I'm just trying to kick off the inevitable Glock fan-boy vs. 1911 fan-boy vs. CZ fan-boy rumble.   :aok


Itís all in good fun!  I love the m1911ís. The thing I like most about my glock is not having a button safety.
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Offline Maverick

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Re: Looking toward getting an M1911
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2020, 10:17:01 AM »
"And you can't use handloads in without voiding your warranty."

Pretty much all handgun warranties have a similar clause in the fine print. Unless you get a catastrophic event I can't see how they could enforce it. Especially snice the Pro shooters using their products run lots of reloads through them in practice and competition.

I get it you don't like glocks. That's fine, handguns are a subjective topic, pretty much like ford vs chevy vs dodge etc. No need to be a broken record about it.
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Offline Gman

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Re: Looking toward getting an M1911
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2020, 06:26:45 AM »
Meatwad, there are a lot of 1911 models out there, make sure you try a few before spending $.  Try and find a range that rents various 1911s and shoot some before making a decision, even regarding which caliber you want 9/45.  9mm is on a big upswing in 1911 sales, a very large portion of the 1911 market is 9mm now, with good reasons.  Higher magazine capacity, less recoil, less cost, and with newer ammunition technology, very good effects on targets compared to the 9mms of the past.

Like Maverick mentioned, adjustable sights might be something you want to consider, but there are positives and negatives with pretty much every facet of picking a 1911 when it comes to features such as this.  Adjustable sights, if you intend on taking any training on CQB pistol shooting, will frequently break when you use the sights to manipulate the slide for one handed malfunction drills etc - you'll be using the rear sight assembly to hook onto your belt, shoe heel, etc etc if you can only shoot/reload/clear with one hand during training drills.  That said, with fixed rear sights you'll lose the ability to adjust the elevation of your sights, and sometimes even the windage as well depending on the type of rear sight. 

I've got a few 9mm 1911s, a Nighthawk 1911 in 9mm, and a couple Kimber 9mm.  My old company was the national distributor for Kimber here in Canada, so my vault at home was lousy with their stuff.

Again, try and at the very least hold and physically evaluate in person any 1911 you plan on buying as your first handgun.  As well try and shoot a few different models and calibers too.  Do research as well on any models you have it narrowed down to. 

I still have my very first 1911, one of the Valtro 1998A1 models John Jardine made, I got one out of his first batch, and have 20k through it.  I got pretty lucky getting it, and didn't buy it out of knowledge, research, or doing anything I should have done before purchasing a "first" handgun of any type.  There wasn't nearly as much or as easy to access information back then, so take advantage of this Meatwad and make sure you get something you won't have any regrets over.