Author Topic: World War IIís Worst Airplane  (Read 1338 times)

Offline LCADolby

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Re: World War IIís Worst Airplane
« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2020, 01:05:08 PM »
Gloster Meteor.

Did little more than pop a handful of doodle bugs in ww2 because it was "too precious" to fight on the frontline, then quickly fell into obsolescence post war.

Offline Vulcan

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Re: World War IIís Worst Airplane
« Reply #31 on: June 08, 2020, 09:09:31 PM »
Gloster Meteor.

Did little more than pop a handful of doodle bugs in ww2 because it was "too precious" to fight on the frontline, then quickly fell into obsolescence post war.

That's not true.

Offline Greebo

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Re: World War IIís Worst Airplane
« Reply #32 on: June 09, 2020, 03:10:16 AM »
The Meteor was certainly not a good design with its unsophisticated aerodynamics and with its wide set engines causing a high accident rate. That the RAF initially decided to limit its front line use because they didn't want it falling into enemy hands though is not a mark of failure but of success. Despite its faults it was after all the fastest operational Allied aircraft of the war. Post war it became one of the main RAF front line fighters, several hundred were sold to other air forces and it was only made obsolete in around 1950 by the widespread adoption of the Mig 15, something that was also true to some extent for every other Allied straight wing jet fighter.

If we are talking jets I'd say the Me-163 is a better candidate for WW2's worst airplane, it was more dangerous to its pilots than to the enemy and rocket fighters were a complete dead end technology-wise.